Blog Entry Two

For this blog entry I choose a “Bridge over a Pond of Water Lilies” by Claude Monet.

This painting is part of a sort of masterwork, so I struggled to find an analysis/critique of this work specifically that did not mention the other paintings. The one commonality between the critiques were that Monet seemed to drive himself to madness with this painting. He wanted to capture the changing of the lights, the intricate details of the lilies. They comment on his brushstrokes and rudimentary color palette.

I am not particularly drawn to Monet’s work, as I mentioned in class, but this painting does bring me a sense of joy when I look at it. With that in mind, I’m hoping I will be able to accurately test this painting against Kant’s first movement. On page 282 Kant says “We must not be in the least prejudice in favor of the existence of things, but be quite indifferent in this respect, in order to play the judge in things of taste.” I don’t have any specific affection for Monet or this painting, I forget it even exists until I see it again, but when I do, I enjoy seeing it. The colors are beautiful, and serene, the setting is calming, and I feel drawn in every time I look at it.

Monet.jpg

This is why I disagree with the critics, I’m not an art critic or a painter, so I don’t see these flaws in brushstrokes or basic color schemes. I just see a painting that makes me feel joy when I see it. I can understand thinking this painting is not “beautiful” because of its flaws, but to an untrained eye those flaws are not noticeable.

https://museu.ms/article/details/110232/daily-art-story-monets-water-lilies

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2 Comments

  1. kathydsimmons says:

    I really like this painting too. I can’t pass moment 1 with this painting, personally, because once I know a painting and/or artist is famous… it colors how I look at it. It either makes me skeptical (if it’s too weird for my taste) or a sheep that follows the crowd if I like it. 😛

    Like

  2. megsimonsen says:

    I totally understand what you mean, Kathy, that’s how I usually feel about great works of art.

    Like

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